Thank you!

A big THANK YOU to everyone who helped get SB 1826 passed in the General Assembly!  It is so important for women to have access to midwifery services and proving this importance is a big next step. The pilot program is set to launch in 2023!
As our spounser Senetor Van Pelt stressed, “So many black mothers have died unnecessarily due to racism within our healthcare system and lack of options for care.”

RESOURCES

Take a Look

See the bills that we recently advocated for on the Illinois General Assembly Website.

Volunteer and keep updated

Join our mailing list to get updates on what we’re doing, where we are and how you can tag along!

The historical role of the African American midwife was one of hope and health; whose expertise helped define cultural perceptions of motherhood, protected, uplifted and empowered women and men, and improved maternity care in communities across the nation…She carried valuable information, passed on by predecessors across generations, that positively impacted the social health of the family structure and overall health of the community. With her eradication, so was her guidance.” 
-Shafia Monroe

Sign the Petition!

Illinois’s failure to join the other 36 states who license and regulate CPMs will result in this state missing part of the billions of dollars in forthcoming federal HRSA grants and private venture capital intended to grow this nation’s workforce of Black Certified Professional Midwives over the next five years. This is a mistake that will come at a huge financial cost to Illinois taxpayers and an unacceptable human cost among families of color.

Watch and Share

The terms midwife, granny-midwife, and granny were used to describe traditional Black midwives, who were well respected by their community and who still attended up to 75% of births in the 1940s in the Southeastern United States. Beginning in the early 1800s, many states created laws that prohibited lay midwives. From that time to the mid-1900s, all lay midwives, including Black granny-midwives, were systematically ousted until there were none left at all.

“One of the darkest moments in US history was the systematic eradication of the African American midwife from her community, resulting in a legacy of birth injustices.”

– Shafia M. Monroe, DEM, CDT, MPH

Pilot Program

Who is the Pilot program for?

Any pregnant person living in Cook County who is eligible for Medicaid and is interested in having the option to give birth in an out-of-hospital setting.

When will it happen?

The Pilot program is set to launch by January 1, 2023

WHO would especially benefit?

We expect this program would be especially beneficial for participants who:

  • Are concerned about encountering implicit bias from care providers
  • Value trauma-informed care
  • Experience barriers to consistently attending facility-based prenatal care visits:
    • Inflexible work hours
    • Child care demands
    • Transportation issues
  • Have had prior unsatisfactory experience giving birth in a hospital
  • Value shared decision-making with their perinatal care providers
  • Wish to avoid unnecessary medical interventions
  • Value experiencing labor and delivery in an out-of-hospital setting whenever medically appropriate.

This is a hybrid model of perinatal care, combining three high-value services:

a. Strong Start Initiative for Mothers and Newborns (national)

b. Florida’s Commonsense Childbirth case study

a. Michigan’s Maternal Infant Health Program (MIHP)

b. Maximizes patient benefit from prenatal care by reducing barriers to attendance

– Doulas provide support prenatal, during labor/delivery, and postpartum.

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES

Thank you!

A big THANK YOU to everyone who helped get SB 1826 passed in the General Assembly!  It is so important for women to have access to midwifery services and proving this importance is a big next step.
The pilot program is set to launch in 2023!
As our spounser Senetor Van Pelt stressed, “So many black mothers have died unnecessarily due to racism within our healthcare system and lack of options for care.”

Volunteer and keep updated

Join our mailing list to get updates on what we’re doing, where we are and how you can tag along!

Sign the Petition!

Illinois’s failure to join the other 36 states who license and regulate CPMs will result in this state missing part of the billions of dollars in forthcoming federal HRSA grants and private venture capital intended to grow this nation’s workforce of Black Certified Professional Midwives over the next five years. This is a mistake that will come at a huge financial cost to Illinois taxpayers and an unacceptable human cost among families of color.

watch and share

The terms midwife, granny-midwife, and granny were used to describe traditional Black midwives, who were well respected by their community and who still attended up to 75% of births in the 1940s in the Southeastern United States. Beginning in the early 1800s, many states created laws that prohibited lay midwives. From that time to the mid-1900s, all lay midwives, including Black granny-midwives, were systematically ousted until there were none left at all.

“One of the darkest moments in US history was the systematic eradication of the African American midwife from her community, resulting in a legacy of birth injustices.”

– Shafia M. Monroe, DEM, CDT, MPH

Take a Look

See the bills that we recently advocated for on the Illinois General Assembly Website.

The historical role of the African American midwife was one of hope and health; whose expertise helped define cultural perceptions of motherhood, protected, uplifted and empowered women and men, and improved maternity care in communities across the nation…She carried valuable information, passed on by predecessors across generations, that positively impacted the social health of the family structure and overall health of the community. With her eradication, so was her guidance.” 
-Shafia Monroe

Pilot Program

Who is this program for?

Any pregnant person living in Cook County who is eligible for Medicaid and is interested in having the option to give birth in an out-of-hospital setting.

When will it happen?

The Pilot program is set to launch by January 1, 2023

WHO would especially benefit?

We expect this program would be especially beneficial for participants who:

  • Are concerned about encountering implicit bias from care providers
  • Value trauma-informed care
  • Experience barriers to consistently attending facility-based prenatal care visits:
    • Inflexible work hours
    • Child care demands
    • Transportation issues
  • Have had prior unsatisfactory experience giving birth in a hospital
  • Value shared decision-making with their perinatal care providers
  • Wish to avoid unnecessary medical interventions
  • Value experiencing labor and delivery in an out-of-hospital setting whenever medically appropriate.
PROGRAM OBJECTIVES